Dr. Joseph McGargill said emergency rooms and urgent care facilities will likely see multiple cases of frostbite this week.McGargill, who practices at MercyOne in Pleasant Hill, said frostbite can happen quickly in extreme temperatures.”Depending on the wind chill out there, it can damage your skin in minutes,” he said.But it’s more than just frostbite that McGargill is warning Iowans about.Asthma, arthritis, and even cardiac arrests are a growing concern with frigid temperatures. “Your body tries to contain the heat inside of itself, so it closes down its arteries on the surface of your skin. It also kind of closes up some vasospasms — your arteries in your heart,” McGargill said.What’s dangerous about the end of this week is the combination of wind and cold air.KCCI Chief Meteorologist Chris Gloninger says a big concern is getting stranded, even if you’re inside a car.“When that wind is 40 to 50 miles per hour, that’s what drops our wind chill down to 40 degrees below zero which is dangerous. That’s something we haven’t seen in probably more than a decade,” Gloninger said. “Your body temperature will drop, even if you’re inside a car,” Gloninger said. “Once that engine dies, the air temperature drops in the car, putting you at risk.”It’s highly advised that people don’t travel Thursday or Friday, or spend much time outside unless they have to. “It’s the blowing and drifting snow, dropping visibility, and in the off chance your car is in a ditch and a first responder can’t get to you, that’s when it becomes a life-threatening situation,” Gloninger said.Babies and older people are most at risk in the extreme cold. And with a rise in respiratory illnesses, doctors say not to venture out unless absolutely necessary.

Dr. Joseph McGargill said emergency rooms and urgent care facilities will likely see multiple cases of frostbite this week.

McGargill, who practices at MercyOne in Pleasant Hill, said frostbite can happen quickly in extreme temperatures.

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“Depending on the wind chill out there, it can damage your skin in minutes,” he said.

But it’s more than just frostbite that McGargill is warning Iowans about.

Asthma, arthritis, and even cardiac arrests are a growing concern with frigid temperatures.

“Your body tries to contain the heat inside of itself, so it closes down its arteries on the surface of your skin. It also kind of closes up some vasospasms — your arteries in your heart,” McGargill said.

What’s dangerous about the end of this week is the combination of wind and cold air.

KCCI Chief Meteorologist Chris Gloninger says a big concern is getting stranded, even if you’re inside a car.

“When that wind is 40 to 50 miles per hour, that’s what drops our wind chill down to 40 degrees below zero which is dangerous. That’s something we haven’t seen in probably more than a decade,” Gloninger said.

“Your body temperature will drop, even if you’re inside a car,” Gloninger said. “Once that engine dies, the air temperature drops in the car, putting you at risk.”

It’s highly advised that people don’t travel Thursday or Friday, or spend much time outside unless they have to.

“It’s the blowing and drifting snow, dropping visibility, and in the off chance your car is in a ditch and a first responder can’t get to you, that’s when it becomes a life-threatening situation,” Gloninger said.

Babies and older people are most at risk in the extreme cold. And with a rise in respiratory illnesses, doctors say not to venture out unless absolutely necessary.

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